Monday, January 8, 2018

From Spreadsheets to Sticky Notes: 7 Strategies for Managing Your Job Search

Article originally published on Glassdoor 
When you’re actively looking for a new job, you can’t afford to wing it on the organizational front. Whether you apply for five jobs or 100, you’ll soon find yourself buried in an extraordinary number of resumes, cover letters, job descriptions and interview invitations. If you don’t keep them carefully organized, you may not identify the right opportunity — or worse, you’ll flounder when the right opportunity comes along.
If you want to stay on top of all of the applications, LinkedIn requests and other digital paraphernalia that go along with your job search, it’s time to break up with your bad organization habits. Here are seven techniques that will help you overcome the most common job hunt organization issues so that you know the where, what, who and how for your next interview:

1. If you aren’t good at organizing… figure out why

Organizational skills aren’t one-size-fits-all. There are just as many ways to be disorganized as there are to be organized. Instead of haphazardly applying “organization tactics” to your job search, try to identify specific ways that you tend to be disorganized and troubleshoot those issues directly.
For example, do you tend to lose hard copies? Digital apps will be where it’s at for you. But if you forget anything that isn’t written on pen and paper, a paper calendar or sticky note wall will be a better solution. And if you aren’t sure how you like to stay organized, try something new. If you’re usually an Apple Calendar kind of person, start using a paper planner, or vice versa.
2. If you have a hard time following up… use a spreadsheet
When your job search is in full swing, it’s way too easy to send an email and forget it. Not only can this cost you when you aren’t following up at appropriate intervals, but it can also make you feel like you’re constantly treading water without getting anywhere. Your job hunt becomes an overwhelming, never-ending headache instead of a systematic, purposeful journey.
Combat this by starting a detailed spreadsheet that tracks all the pertinent details of your job search, such as the company, job listing and contact details. As you move through the job hunt process (and the interview process), highlight the steps you’ve “completed” so you can show yourself just how much work you’ve done along the way.

3. If you need reminders… go high tech

There’s nothing wrong with manual spreadsheets that lists all of the job search details you need to know if it’s working for you. But if it’s not working for you — if you frequently forget to update the spreadsheet and you’re never quite sure about what your next step should be — you need to take your job search into the 21st century with a free online project management tool like Trello or Wrike.
Using a project management tool as a job seeker allows you to organize all of the job search details and automate when and to whom you should send a follow-up note. You can also adjust your settings to automatically receive reminders when it’s time to update the individual jobs or check in on the progress of the hiring manager.

4. If you’re a visual person… try sticky notes

The sticky note wall is a tried-and-true organizational method that works for writing a book, setting goals and yes, getting a new job. First, pick a large wall you can divide into 3-4 columns. At the top of each column, mark out a different stage of the job process or your job search to-do list (e.g. “Draft Resume,” “Apply,” “Interview”). Then, write each job on a sticky note and set it in its appropriate column. As you work through your job hunt and make progress, move the sticky note to the next step.
Not only can it be very motivating to see your progress in such a visual way, but it is easy to get a quick snapshot of where you are in the process by simply glancing at your sticky note wall. Pro tip: You can also use the “Sticky Notes App” on your phone or computer if a digital version of the sticky notes would save you the wall space.
5. If you forget the details… keep thorough notes
If you’re speaking to one or two prospective employers each week, it can be tough to remember who’s who and what you talked about. If you don’t take careful notes, you may unwittingly repeat yourself or send a thank-you note to the wrong person and reference the wrong conversation. Talk about awkward!
If that sounds like something that could happen to you, use a free tool like Microsoft OneNote or Evernote to keep track of the meetings you have. For extra memory help, pull the LinkedIn photo of the person you’re speaking with into the note sheet and capture notes like the person’s company, job title and location. Not only can you look at a picture of a real person when you’re in the midst of a phone screen interview, but you can also easily go back and remember who you spoke with when you’re considering job offers or writing thank-you notes.

6. If you’re losing motivation… make a list of reasons you’re searching

If you find yourself putting off your job search or simply not looking forward to any part of the process, you’re letting the discomfort of a job hunt distract you from the reason you’re looking for a new job. Get back in the right headspace by bringing the focus back to what motivates you.
Make a list of the reasons you’re looking for a new job — toxic workplace, skipped over for a promotion, low salary, etc. — and keep it in a prominent place. Not only will this motivate you to stick to your plan and find a new job, but it will also prepare you for the interviews ahead by keeping your deeper purpose of your job search front and center.

7. If you’re feeling burned out… schedule some downtime

Little tasks can pile up, especially if you’re managing a full-time job during your job search. Instead of spending a whole day on your job hunt once a month and getting frustrated with your lack of progress, set short but regular periods of time to check in and make consistent progress. A half hour two or three times a week will ensure that you’re responding to hiring managers at appropriate intervals and staying on top of new opportunities as they come out.
A job search is a job of its own: you’re practicing time management, patience and even customer service as you balance your search with your current job. But you don’t have to let the complexity of all the resumes, cover letters, applications and interviews throw you off. Just find an organizational method that works for you so that the energy you put into the job search pays off with a new job — not a new headache!
Searching for a new job? Comment below or contact one of our expert recruiters today! Find the closest CFS location to you here.
Read the original article posted on Glassdoor

Wednesday, December 20, 2017

2018 Salary Guides available now!


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Monday, November 6, 2017

Do's and Don'ts of Thank You Emails


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Monday, October 23, 2017

CFS named a #MostSociallyEngaged Staffing Agency of 2017!


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Wednesday, October 11, 2017

4 things you must remove from your LinkedIn profile

Article originally published on Forbes

More and more, people are forming their first impression of you from the results of a web search on your name. When people are evaluating you in a professional capacity, they often go directly to your LinkedIn profile. But even if their research starts with Google, they’ll end up at LinkedIn because your profile will most likely be one of the top results.

So you need to be concerned about what you put in your LinkedIn profile  making sure it’s authentic, compelling to your audience and aspirational  positioning you for the future. You need to be equally focused on removing things from your profile that will get in the way of your success. You want all of the content to “wow” those who are making decisions about you.

Here are four things you should remove from your profile in order to make a positive impact on readers.

1. Wrong or irrelevant endorsements. Delete endorsements for the skills that you don’t want to be known for; they just muddy the waters. Personal branding is about being known for SOMEthing, not 10,000 things. That means you need to make your skills pure  positioning you for what’s next, not creating confusion among readers. “Is this person a marketing exec or a real-estate agent?” Make a list of all skills that are relevant to who you are and where you're going without looking at your LinkedIn profile. Then, take a look at the skills for which you have been endorsed. Is there a strong correlation? And make sure your top three skills perfectly reflect how you want to be known. Those are the ones that show up prominently when someone is looking at your profile. Viewers need to click “view more” to see the rest of your skills. And don’t worry about offending anyone. LinkedIn will not send a note to those who endorsed you when you remove their endorsements.

2. Experience that distracts from your brand aspirations. If you started your career in retail and now you’re all about pharmaceutical research, you want to diminish the past (unless you have a really good story about how it supports what you’re doing and what you want to be doing). Of course, it’s important to show progression in your career, so you may want to group roles from the past under one category like My Proving Ground or Internships and Early Career Experience.

3. Low-quality images. I’m not just talking about your headshot. Any images you added to your profile in the summary or experience sections need to be high-quality and appropriately cropped. Nothing says “lack of attention to detail” like blurry, badly cropped, trite, or unflattering images. Of course, this is most important when it comes to your headshot. If you use a selfie, a photo where you crop out others, or a photo your mother took of you at last year’s family outing, it’s time to remove and replace. Invest in a professionally photographed headshot that projects you in the most positive and powerful light. And avoid full body shots. Let viewers see your face.

4. Third-person writing. Let’s face it, everyone knows you wrote your own LinkedIn summary and experience sections. It’s much more transparent and direct to write in the first person than to pretend that your publicist wrote your content. When you write in the first person, you create a conversation between you and the reader, and that helps you establish a more authentic relationship with them. I am seeing more and more profiles using the first person (even from CEOs – who probably do have someone writing it for them) but not everyone is there yet. It’s time for you take the third person out of your profile and get comfortable with me, myself, and I.

Searching for a new job? Comment below or contact one of our expert recruiters today! Find the closest CFS location to you here.

Read the original article posted on Forbes

Friday, October 6, 2017

Why companies use CFS temporary staffing services


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Friday, September 29, 2017

Advantages of CFS direct hire services


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